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The best Oculus Rift games available today

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By Phil Hornshaw


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The Oculus Rift had a tough go of it out of the gate. Delayed shipments and a sparse library of games made its first six months on the market rocky. Then, in late 2016, the delayed Oculus Touch controllers arrived, upping the quality of most games and giving players full motion control with each hand.

It’s now well into its lifespan and the Oculus Rift continues to impress with a steady stream of solid experiences. From first-person shooters to frightful psychological horror games to quirky puzzlers to co-op games, the platform has something for everyone. We’ve combed through its library to compile the best Oculus Rift games available on the VR headset today.

Adventure

‘Lone Echo’

Numerous VR experiences have attempted to capture the feeling of floating in space, but the Oculus exclusive title Lone Echo is the only one to do it in a way that feels accurate.

In reality, most of your actions involve simple maintenance fixes to a space station, but through the excellent Oculus Touch controllers, all of your movements have an immersion to them that few VR games have been able to replicate thus far.

With a strong sci-fi story and a wonderfully realized space setting, Lone Echo‘s several hours of play are the best way to visit space from your living room.

Read our full Lone Echo review

Buy it now on:

Oculus Amazon

‘Wilson’s Heart’

One of the more ambitious Oculus Rift games to date, Wilson’s Heart serves up psychological horror through the immersive experience of VR. Set in the 1940s, the game follows hospital patient Robert Wilson, who wakes up only to realize that his heart has been replaced by a perplexing device.

You play as Wilson, but you’re not the only one with disturbing woes. As you make your way down spooky, tight corridors, you’ll meet an eccentric cast of characters, all of whom want to find out how and why they have been poked and prodded by the dastardly hospital staff. Full of jump scares and eerie realizations, Wilson’s Heart makes great use of the Touch controllers to get you into the thick of its mind-altering horrors.

Read our full Wilson’s Heart review

Buy it now on:

Amazon

‘The Invisible Hours’

Developer Tequila Works has used VR to try something a little different — a murder mystery where you spend your time observing various people and their roles in the story. Set in a giant mansion owned by Nikola Tesla, the story’s murder victim, your job is to wander the house as a ghostly, unseen observer, searching for clues and watching people to find out what’s really going on, and who the culprit is.

True to the genre, everyone is up to something and the story gets pretty twisty. You’ll spend your time rewinding and fast-forwarding in order to trace different people’s movements throughout the mansion, to gather clues about who they are, why they’re there, and what they’ve done. While it’s a less interactive experience than most, The Invisible Hours suggests the kind of cool things you can do with VR when it comes to storytelling and giving players the ability to move around a space.

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Oculus

‘Star Trek: Bridge Crew’

Quite possibly the best multiplayer VR experience to date, Star Trek: Bridge Crew lets users play out their childhood fantasies of joining the likes of James T. Kirk, Montgomery Scott, Hikaru Sulu, and Pavel Chekov as a member of a Starfleet crew.

Players work in teams of four, with each person in one of four roles — pilot, engineer, tactician, or captain. Each job — best acted out with an Oculus Touch controller, but playable with an Xbox One controller — asks players to tinker with a computer panel. Bridge Crew excels as a cooperative game due to the need to work together to find success. It really does feel like you’re living inside an episode of Star Trek. Simply put, if you have a group to play with, Bridge Crew should be at the top of your wish list.

Read our full Star Trek: Bridge Crew review

Buy it now on:

Amazon

‘Technolust’

Imagine the kind of cyberpunk, virtual dystopia that came out of sci-fi novels and films from the 1980s and ’90s, and you have Technolust. It’s the kind of game where you “jack in” as a hacker to cross virtual landscapes in order to steal data from a host of evil corporations.

It’s grimy, dark, and completely retro-futuristic, all of which render it worth more than a cursory glance. Technolust’s games-within-the-game moments are a cool and fun addition, too, and add multiple layers to the VR experience.

Buy it now on:

Oculus Steam

‘Fated: The Silent Oath’

The Viking-centered Fated puts you in the role of a man on the verge of death, as he and his family return to their village after an accident. A gift from the gods has kept you from Valhalla but cost you your voice, and things are about to get weird in a Norse mythology kind of way.

Fated is a story-focused game that’s a bit slow but heavy on character development and plot. There’s magic and mystery at play here — as well as quite a bit of Norse mythology — and VR is used to put you in the shoes of a character who’s simply trying to save his people from utter destruction.

Oculus Steam

‘The Assembly’

Another story-heavy experience, The Assembly is basically a first-person adventure game in which players gather items, solve puzzles, and unlock the story by interacting with characters and gleaning information from the environment. The Assembly takes place in a secret scientific laboratory, where personal drama meets the unintended consequences of playing god. It’s not an action-heavy game, and The Assembly assuages some of the VR motion issues with useful tricks for getting around. It’s simply a good entry point for VR newbies who want something that’s heavy on story.

Read our full The Assembly review

Buy it now on:

Oculus Steam

Shooter

‘Superhot VR’

Conceived as an alternate expression of experimental first-person shooter Superhot, Superhot VR adapts the stop-motion mechanic to your arms as you wield Oculus Touch controllers. When you move your hands around, the bullets rain in from enemies, but if you stop to consider your next move, you’ll receive a welcome bullet remission. The goal remains the same — to advance to the exit in each room — but in VR, the intensity is amplified. Dismembering foes in VR will get your blood pumping. You must move your hands methodically to succeed, but Superhot VR‘s ingenious design makes it a constant delight.

Buy it now on:

Amazon

‘Robo Recall’

Originally designed as a pack-in game for the Oculus Touch controllers, Robo Recall is a frantic shoot-em-up designed to make it easy for you to look cool while blowing robots to bits. You play as Agent 34 of the robot manufacturing company RoboReady.

Your job at the company is to remove defective units from the production line, but a virus has turned the robots against their creators, and now you must take them out. While Robo Recall boils down to a series of timed shooting galleries, it’s much more interesting than your average on-rails FPS. You can pick up enemies and fling them into other robots with a swipe of your hand, and you can even catch bullets in the air and whirl them back to turn the infected robots into nothing more than a pile of parts. Robo Recall shows off the brilliance of the Oculus Touch controllers. Best of all, it’s free-to-play.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

‘Arizona Sunshine’

One of the only full-fledged first-person shooters available in VR, Arizona Sunshine drops you into the smoldering heat of an American Southwest that is currently littered with zombies. Using the Oculus Touch, you can aim, shoot, and reload dozens of weapons.

More open than other shooters in VR, Arizona Sunshine has a campaign mode that lets players explore the deserts and caves in search of an escape. After the campaign is finished, there are both single- and multiplayer horde modes, which force you to fight off hordes of the undead. Arizona Sunshine is a fast-paced gore-fest filled with bloodied, hungry zombies. It’s slick and demonstrates how the Oculus Rift can deliver complete packages with multiple game modes.

Buy it now on:

Oculus Amazon

‘EVE: Valkyrie’

One of the better-known Oculus titles to date is EVE: Valkyrie, a game that places you in the role of a spaceship fighter pilot. The good news is that if you’re looking for that kind of experience, Valkyrie brings it.

You’ll shoot through gorgeous space locales like shipyards and asteroid fields, hunting down and dogfighting enemy ships while trying to avoid missile locks and return fire. It’s an intense game in terms of movement, which will make some people sick, but if you can handle it, Valkyrie is the kind of VR proof of concept that’s been exciting players for years.

Buy it now on:

Oculus Amazon

‘Dead and Buried’

dead and buried

First-person shoot-em-up Dead and Buried blends Western and horror genres to create a unique supernatural shootout. The game spawns you in one location, and you’ll duck in and out of cover while defending yourself against either bloodthirsty zombies or other gunslingers.

Whether you’re battling players online or simply taking shots at computer-controlled enemies, the game has several fun modes that should keep you on your toes. Defend against hordes, engage in old-fashioned duels at high noon, or rob a runaway train — the choice is yours.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

Action

‘Virtual Ninja VR’

Every young kid’s dream is to become a ninja, mastering the katana and throwing shuriken soaring toward your enemies. With Virtual Ninja VR, you can do just that, fighting off samurai with carefully-timed blocks and powerful strikes in order to come out on top.

You’ll also be tested with the precision of your shuriken throws, and you can even cut through watermelon to become a real fruit ninja. To really test your skill, however, you’ll have to fight the game’s five bosses, each of which are imposing enough to make you soil your virtual pants.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

‘Job Simulator: The 2050 Archives’

A testament to how VR excels at turning menial tasks into engaging, even sometimes transformative experiences, Owlchemy Labs’ Job Simulator: The 2050 Archives pretty much plays as advertised. Yet, the mundane becomes fascinating in VR. Who would have thought? The year is 2050, and humans have automated every job.

To spice up your unburdened human life, you can now use a VR headset to simulate what “honest work” was all about. You can ring up chips and drinks as a convenience store clerk, fix cars as a mechanic, man the griddle as a short-order cook, or process paperwork as a run-of-the-mill 9-to-5 office worker. Of course, this is what robots thought work was like, so it may be different and much funnier than you remember.

Buy it now on:

Oculus Amazon

‘The Unspoken’

This is the closest you can get to being a wizard at home. Oculus exclusive The Unspoken from heralded developer Insomniac Games does an exceedingly impressive job of making you feel like you’re doing a lot of wizarding work without demanding much of you.

The Unspoken is an urban fantasy filled with customizable wizards and spellcasters, and you just happen to be one of them. The wide array of spells deployed via Oculus Touch controllers almost feel as if they are truly being guided from your fingertips. There’s some exploration here and a dreary game world, but the meat of the experience comes from the duels that help you advance through the ranks of a wizard fight club. Unlike the fight club you’re thinking of, it’s okay to talk about this one. We recommend you play it, too.

Buy it now on:

Amazon

‘Chronos’

For people used to playing traditional video games and looking to ease into the world of VR, Chronos is a great option. An easy comparison is Dark Souls. It’s a game full of pitched sword duels in which you have to carefully land blows and defend against the attacks of your foes to stay alive.

Chronos eschews the usual VR approach of the first-person viewpoint — in which you see the game through the eyes of the character you’re playing as — in favor of the third-person view, where you watch and control the action from a separate perspective, much like a camera recording an event.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

‘Edge of Nowhere’

Insomniac Games took a stab at doing horror in virtual reality in a way that’s different from nearly every other game of that genre on the platform. Rather than go the usual route, using a first-person perspective that has you playing as if you’re in the shoes (and seeing through the eyes) of the protagonist, it puts the camera behind the main character, just like in Chronos.

The result is a more psychological, stealthy take on horror. Edge of Nowhere is another of those VR games that feels like it could easily exist as a more traditional game, but it does some experimentation with the platform to find new ways to scare players.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

‘Subnautica’

It seems like survival games are all the rage these days, and the best survival offering on the Oculus store is Subnautica. After your giant spaceship crashes in an alien ocean, your task becomes salvaging the wreckage and finding a way to stay alive.

That means gathering plants for food, finding components necessary to purify the water, and getting together the stuff needed to build tools. Oh, and you’ll need to keep from becoming lunch for some alien critter, as well. Subnautica is still being actively developed (it’s in Early Access on Steam), so it’s not altogether complete. However, it does provide a strange and beautiful world in which to get lost.

Buy it now on:

Oculus Steam

‘Megaton Rainfall’

With the power trip you can experience in virtual reality, it’s rather astounding that more developers haven’t created superhero experiences. Megaton Rainfall is one of the few out there, and it offers you the chance to sour through the sky and fire extremely powerful blasts at enemies and buildings lining the ground.

You can each break out of the Earth’s atmosphere and head into space like you’re a Superman about to reverse the rotation of the planet, all at ridiculous speeds that would even make Goku jealous.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

Platforming

‘Lucky’s Tale’

Although it’s another game that doesn’t really need to be in virtual reality, Lucky’s Tale is still a good way to ease into VR, and it’s a game that makes interesting use of the way the Rift presents players with a presence in a space.

The game feels mostly like something akin to Mario 64, but with the player acting as the camera that hovers above the action. Your ability to look around in the space does some interesting things to the standard platforming formula. In Lucky’s Tale, how you go about looking at each portion of a level changes how you deal with it.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

‘Mount Wingsuit’

If you’re a normal, sane person, the prospect of jumping off a cliff in a wingsuit is terrifying and something you’ll never actually do in real life that’s why Mount Wingsuit is such a welcome VR experience.

Starting from a high peak, you soar through the air and race across the mountainside, all while flying through rings and attempting to keep yourself from meeting an untimely (and bloody) demise. Luckily, the death you’ll experience is also virtual, so you can learn from your mistakes and give it another go.

Buy it now on:

Oculus

Role-playing

‘The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim VR’

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim has come to practically every system known to man, so it isn’t a huge surprise that Bethesda’s masterpiece role-playing game eventually hit the Oculus Rift, as well. Skyrim VR is the full Skyrim experience rather than a pared down experience, so you can explore all of its worlds with more immersion than ever before.

Your first dragon kill in VR will be even more rewarding, and feeling like you’re actually the one firing your bow or casting spells only allows you to get sucked into the game further. You’ll have no choice but to throw another 200 hours into the game, even if it’s just to steal everyone’s gold and let dragons kill them again.

Read our full Skyrim VR review

Buy it now on:

Steam

Puzzle

‘Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes’

Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes is a party game where people share a room, but only one person is in VR. The person wearing the headset can see and interact with a bomb that’s covered in special panels, each presenting a puzzle that requires a solution to defuse the explosive. But the VR player has no idea what any of what the or she is seeing means, so it’s on the other people in the room to help explain it, using a super-complex bomb-defusing manual.

The game requires quick thinking, communication, and teamwork, and it leads to some hilarious moments as players scramble to find the right information in the manual. Best of all, it’s an excuse to play a VR game while entertaining.

Buy it now on:

Steam

‘I Expect You to Die’

Though the title of this game might lead you to expect another horror experience, it’s quite the opposite. I Expect You to Die puts you in the shoes of the world’s least competent secret agent and tasks you with completing several clever puzzles that are interspersed with hilarious dialogue and zany situations.

The game requires players to use the Oculus Touch controllers, as you’ll be picking up/interacting with dozens of in-game objects — like lit dynamite, for example. The game feels like a classic British spy show, except its light on the villains and heavy on the humor.

Buy it now on:

Oculus Amazon

Music

‘Beat Sabre’

Until Disney or Electronic Arts decide to make a Star Wars virtual reality game, we won’t be swinging any lightsabers on Oculus Rift, but we can come very, very close with Beat Sabre.

The rhythm game has you swinging multiple swords along to the rhythm of each song, swiping up, down, left, right, and diagonally as you become a pseudo-conductor of the action. It’s thrilling and quite challenging, and you’ll be ready to face the Jedi Knight trials after you’ve mastered its dangerous interpretive dancing.

Buy it now on:

Oculus Steam


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